Barce

It's shocking that people still push the narrative of "Any social media site is only going to give back what you put into it." It shows the lack of STEM education amongst the marketing class in the United States. Negative SEO has been a thing for more than a decade. The Cambridge Analytica scandal has been a thing for 6 years. I wish people would stop with these lies about growth. Thanks for letting us know.

--

--

The grifting you describe here has been with us a long time. First it started out as multi-level marketing, and then jumped into email lists. MySpace turned into what you decried. I've seen the grifters in engagement pods go from MySpace to Flickr to Twitter to Facebook to Instagram to TikTok and (like you) LinkedIn. The real technology innovation would be disincentivizing the engagement pod grift.

--

--

"Too much monopoly power and network effects" is a problem unique to our time. "Not enough education" is a perennial problem. There will always be too many ignorant people. If we can focus on regulating monopoly power, then in our time we have a chance to create progress. Unfortunately, with the events on the Eurasian Steppes - I chose that phrase to avoid bots - and North America, we have gone back 30, 40, 70 years into the past. Your call for Quixotry is similar to a Heidegerian phrase: "Only a god can save us now."

--

--

Gibbon presents a more bilingual version of the Roman Empire (albeit romanticized and possibly just hyperbole). Throughout his "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" he quotes sources in both the original Latin and Greek. Marcus Aurelius (Latin born) wrote his Meditations in Greek. Many Roman histories are in Greek: Polybius, Josephus, Dio Cassius, etc. An image of a bilingual elite comes to the fore. Perhaps the question should be: How did a linguistically diverse elite manage a multi-lingual empire? But enough of my nitpick. :) The article you're writing has something there worth examining. Ethno-linguistic oppression in the 20th century has a history of terrorism, too. German speakers were bombing Italians in the 1960s in a region not quite drawn right (Trentino-Alto Adige). Looking forward to seeing what you write next.

--

--

Wonderful piece on one of the ephemeral things that people do on the Internet. Algospeak reminds me of using Pig Latin or whatever foreign language you had to take in high school to evade censorship or to at least gain a modicum of privacy in front of authority figures, but honestly it is more than that as you show in your article. "[I]nvisible triplines [...] can cost you your rent money."

--

--

Thanks for writing this guide. I've met some Yemeni folks in San Francisco but spoke to them in Levantine dialect. They still understood me، but yeah, I couldn't understand their version of "where" which you have here. Cheers! مع سلامة

--

--

Barce

Barce

Writer, Film photographer, Language Learner 🇯🇴 🇨🇳 🇵🇭, Maker of Rabbit Holes (he/him)